.

Anniston foundation, Teddy's Star receives $2,500 from Westinghouse - Kicks off fund raising campaign.
By Bill Edwards
Staff Writer, The Anniston Star

 The Anniston Chemical Agent Disposal Facility Funds Committee presented a check to Teddy's Star A Foundation for Hope at the BB&T Bank.  Participating in the check presentation were, from left, Teddy's Star Advisory Committee member Jack Thrasher, foundation board member George H. Deyo, foundation President Mary M. McLaughlin, Steve Bragg of Westinghouse Anniston, foundation Executive Vice President of the Board of Directors David E. Lindquist and Chip Burson, associate director, Corporate Research & Development Alliances, Office of Research, Vanderbilt University. Photo: Special to The Star 

The Anniston Chemical Agent Disposal Facility Funds Committee presented a check to Teddy's Star A Foundation for Hope at the BB&T Bank building in Anniston on Tuesday. Participating in the check presentation were, from left, Teddy's Star Advisory Committee member Jack Thrasher, foundation board member George H. Deyo, foundation President Mary M. McLaughlin, Steve Bragg of Westinghouse Anniston, foundation Executive Vice President of the Board of Directors David E. Lindquist and Chip Burson, associate director, Corporate Research & Development Alliances, Office of Research, Vanderbilt University. Photo: Special to The Star 

Ten years after its launch, an Anniston-based foundation to improve the lives of paralyzed and other disabled persons, has received a financial shot in the arm.  Teddy's Star A Foundation for Hope received $2,500 from Westinghouse, operators of the Anniston Chemical Agent Disposal Facility.

Mary M. McLaughlin, president of the foundation and mother of the young man for whom the group is named, accepted the check in the offices of BB&T bank Tuesday morning. Teddy died in an automobile accident in July 1999; the foundation was launched in November of that year.

Presented on behalf of 850 employees of the chemical weapons incinerator, the gift is being counted as something of a "re-infusion of energy" for the foundation after some years of relative inactivity. Foundation officials concede that at the moment their strong suit is their network of expertise, not a sizeable bank account. The foundation's advisory committee is national in scope, but the donation Tuesday was seen as the kickoff to a million-dollar goal that will enable the foundation to fulfill its mission. "That's why this first new gift is so important," said Chip Burson of Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Burson is an advisor to the foundation, having become acquainted with the McLaughlin family around five years ago through his work with Auburn University's canine training program at McClellan. Representing Westinghouse, Steve Bragg said his company usually doesn't get involved with charitable foundations, but "was very impressed" with the foundation's mission and leadership.

Edward D. McLaughlin Jr., Teddy's father, is chairman of the 501(c)3 foundation, which is incorporated in Delaware with offices in Anniston. It has a volunteer staff and intends to keep administrative costs at 10 percent.

Its donations will be used for specific known cases, Burson said. "We're not going to call upon resources until we have some demand from clients," he said. The foundation's mission is to provide assistive technology to people with disabilities who are unable to afford them. The devices and systems help people with paralysis or similar physical disabilities live more independently.

TOP

OR Donate Now

E-Mail




Copyright © 2001-2015, Teddy's Star Foundation, All Rights Reserved
Site designed and hosted by DELCOM Services, Inc
.